In this installment of the Motor Show Roundup (formerly known as The Best, The Worst and The Biggest Surprises), we’ll be discussing Redline’s picks from the recent 2019 Frankfurt motor show.

Best Production Car: Volkswagen ID.3 and Porsche Taycan

This category was impossible to split. On one hand you’ve got the Volkswagen ID.3, a practical electric hatchback with enough range for everyone, potent performance, a minimalist interior and a reasonable €30,000 starting price. Then there’s the Porsche Taycan which, despite its slightly disappointing range, delivers blistering yet repeatable performance and lightning charging speeds that is sure to be a worthy challenger for the Tesla Model S.

The real winner here is not the ID.3 nor the Taycan, it’s electricity as a whole.

 

Best Concept: Mercedes-Benz Vision EQS

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The Vision EQS just edges out Hyundai’s 45 to take the crown of Frankfurt’s best concept. Despite being adorned in a flurry of LED dots and strips, spy shots have shown that its stunning lines and sporty form will reach the showroom floor.

 

Worst Car/Concept: BMW Concept 4

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There wasn’t much competition on this one. One glance at those gaping grilles shows that BMW’s design language has evolved from its simple, stylish former self into something much bolder and more controversial. Adding salt to the wound, spy shots and renders of the upcoming M3 and M4 have displayed that the tall kidneys will indeed make it to production. Send help.

 

Biggest Disappointment: Lamborghini Sian

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This is likely to ruffle some feathers. In normal circumstances, I’d praise the debut of an 800 horsepower, naturally aspirated Lamborghini supercar, especially in the wake of tightening emissions regulations and the proliferation of turbocharging.

However, the Sian feels like a perfunctory effort. Yes, its supercapacitor technologies are innovative and high-tech, but the rest of the electrification package is a let-down. Why opt for a 48-volt mild-hybrid system that increases power by just 4 per cent, when the coupe could have been used as a 900-horsepower-plus showcase for the Aventador’s successor, with its long-rumoured and expected plug-in hybrid system and lithium-ion battery?

For $5.3 million AUD before options, I’d expect more than just a redressed Aventador with controversial angular looks and a drag-and-drop engine with minimal electric assistance, especially for 5.58 times the price of the SVJ with identical performance statistics.

 

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